Magellan unveils RoadMate GPS units with auto-replies to calls, earns fellow drivers’ gratitude

Magellan unveils RoadMate GPS navigators with autoreplies to calls, earns gratitude from other drivers

 

Phone use while driving is still a serious problem in the US, even for those trying to quit — which makes us happy to see Magellan doing its part to change travellers’ habits. Out of five new RoadMate GPS units the company is releasing to the world, the Bluetooth-equipped, 4.3-inch 2255T-LMB and 5-inch 5265T-LMB models both carry a Safe Texting mode that can reply to any inbound voice call with a text, supplying either the arrival time or the promise of a call later on. All five of the navigators support a portrait view for more details of the road ahead, and the top two 5-inch devices support Magellan’s $150Back-Up Camera for delicate parking jobs. We’ll have to wait until September before the RoadMates arrive, but the sub-$200 prices will be a relief to other drivers who want at least a few more eyes on the road.

 

source:engadget

Samsung announces 75-inch ES9000 smart TV for Korea, with similarly gigantic price tag (eyes-on)

Samsung announces 75inch ES9000 smart TV for Korea, priced at $17,424 eyeson

 

Anyone looking to fill half of their lounge with Samsung LCD just got a new size to choose. The 75-inch ES9000 is the bigger brother of the ES8000 that we saw earlier this year and ahead of the official launch in Korea, we managed to get an early eyes-on at a Samsung event held yesterday in London. In short, if you loved the LED-backlit display of the 55-inch model, you’re going to adore the ES9000, which features the same smart TV brains alongside a retractable webcam unit housed on the top edge. The picture was pleasingly rich and sharp — presumably due to the aforementioned backlighting and the ES series’ edge-to-edge design. The bevel is a mere 7.9mm and Samsung has decided to coat the frame in a gentle Rose Gold coating which, due to the TV’s slightly shady location, was a little trickier to pick out. That premium finish is matched by a premium price tag, however, and will hit checkbooks for 19.8 million won (around $17,450). Despite the UK appearance, retailer John Lewis (which hosted the event) couldn’t confirm whether retail models would be coming to its stores in the future. But if you can afford 75 inches of TV, you can also afford a quick flight to Seoul to pick one up.

source: engadget

First solar-powered boat to circle the world pulls into home port, contemplates next move

First solar-powered boat to circle the world pulls into home port, contemplates next move

 

It’s been two years since we last heard of the 98-foot-long solar-powered boat, which at the time was gearing up for its big journey around the world. Well, some 19 months and 37,286 miles after setting sail from Monaco, the MS Turanor PlanetSolar has finally made it home. The PlanetSolar broke four Guinness world records along the way, including the all-important “first circumnavigation by solar-powered boat,” and it made stops on six continents to promote solar energy. Oh, and the team fended off Somalian pirates in the process, too. Now that it has a moment to catch its breath and soak up some rays at leisure, the MS Turanor could become any number of things — from the world’s largest solar battery to a “green luxury yacht.” The latter option would certainly befit its chichi home port

 

SOURCE:ENGADGET

Biegert & Funk bring the literal time to your wristwatch with QLOCKTWO

Biergert & Funk bring the literal time to your wristwatch with QLOCKTWO W

 

 

It’s a common desire among everyday folk: we often say we’d like to read more, if only we had the time. While it’s unlikely to fill your noggin with the prose of Hemingway or the poetry of Whitman, a newwristwatch from Biegert & Funk promises to quench your thirst for words and literally provide you withthe time. Known as the QLOCKTWO W, the timepiece is a portable revision of the company’s original wall clock, both of which display the current time in everyday language. Priced at €550, the watch is scheduled for arrival this autumn and will be available in black or stainless steel variations, with either rubber or leather bands. As another option, those who find English far too mundane may spring for the Deutsch version.

 

source:engadget

Restore Your System When You Can’t Launch System Restore

 

System Restore won’t run on Linda Burgess’ PC. I offer some advice.

System Restore automatically backs up the state of Windows and your installed programs (but not your data). When Windows misbehaves, System Restore allows you to return the operating system to a previous condition. So when System Restore misbehaves, you may be tempted to pick up your laptop and smash it into the wall.

That’s not recommended.

Let’s start with the basics: To launch System Restore in Windows 7 or Vista, click Start, typesystem restore, and press ENTER. In XP, select Start>All Programs>Accessories>System Tools>System Restore.

Now, onto Linda’s problem:

Malware often blocks System Restore, so its failure to run could be a sign of infection. Before you do anything else, see Remove Hard-to-Kill Malware and follow the recommendations there.

If that doesn’t solve the problem, try running System Restore in Safe Mode: Boot your PC and pressF8 just before Windows starts loading. Getting the timing right can be tricky; you mayneed to press and release it over and over until you get the desired result.

That result is a simple, text-based menu. Use the keyboard arrow keys to select Safe Mode. Then launch System Restore as described above.

If that doesn’t work, Windows 7 users have another option: the Windows 7 System Repair Disc.

To create it, in Windows 7, select Start, typesystem repair disc, press ENTER and follow the prompts. You’ll need a blank CD-R and an optical drive that can burn one.

Once the disc is burned, leave it in the drive and reboot your PC. Keep an eye on the screen. When you’re prompted to “Press any key;” do so.

Follow the prompts until you get to the “Choose a recovery tool” page. Then select System Restore.

 

source:pcworld